Living Your Legend

Last week the world lost a great man. Scott Dinsmore, husband, son, and creator of the amazing Live Your Legend community.

Like many, I never had the honor of getting to know Scott in person, but I have been a huge fan and supporter since his early blogging days. For those who have been in the “blogging community” since 2008 like I have, there’s an immense feeling of family for all those who dared to share their lives work online.

His work touched the lives of millions. I chatted with Scott a few times via social media and watched his famous TEDx talk more than I can count. And from what I gathered he was a genuine guy who literally left the world doing what he loved.

Like many, his death struck me particularly hard. I’ve been floored to see the hundreds, perhaps thousands of comments and statuses dedicated to a guy who did everything he could to make the world a better place. I’ve spent the bulk of the last week feeling immense sadness and meditating on two very important words.

Death and Legacy.

When I was a junior in highschool, I had my first experience with death, when I witnessed my best friend tragically die in a jet ski accident. The pain and suddenness of it all changed my life forever. Marco’s passing was a wakeup call, that our gifts and time here are finite.

Last week was yet again another painful reminder.

Like Scott, I started the A Boundless World community in hopes of making a difference. I started this community to show that life is meant to be lived. And for many years after Marco passed, I woke up with a hunger and focus to do just that. I was living my legend.

But then… I lost my way.

I started doubting my gifts as a writer and a storyteller. I started listening to the internal voices that I can’t and will never make a difference. I stopped showing up.

Sure, I made some positive attempts here and there, but the for the most part, I’ve failed to live up to my own expectations on what it means to live your legend. Over the better part of the last half decade, I’ve hidden from expressing my truest self.

I’ve struggled with depression. I nearly let gambling ruin my life. I’ve virtually stopped writing, something that brings me so much joy. And the loss of Scott last week presented a sobering reality.

Tomorrow is not guaranteed.

I ache for those close to Scott who lost someone dear to them. I ache for all those who are too afraid to step into their own legend. I ache for those who let fear and scarcity dictate their every move.

Even though my friend Marco passed away nearly ten years ago, people to this day continue to write on his Facebook wall and each time I can’t help but smile. And I know that the legacy that Scott left is destined to have an impact for many many years to come.

It’s easy to feel helpless, lost, and that we don’t matter. But everything we do, everything we say, can have a profound impact on the world around us. Scott lived his legend, and touched the lives and hearts of thousands.

As I’ve continued to reflect on death and legacy, I can’t help but feel immensely grateful for those who dare to share their talents and passions with the world like Scott. I can’t help but feel so much gratitude for the work he dedicated his life to. I can’t feel help but feel so grateful for being alive at one of the most exciting periods of all of history.

I turn 24 on Monday. Twenty four years old. I’ve lived a great life filled with many blessings and hardships alike but I know I can do so much more. I’m tired of running away.

I’m tired of living through the expectations of others. I’m tired of feeling sorry for myself and believing the lie that what I do doesn’t matter.

I don’t know what the future holds, but I’ll do everything I can to make sure I embrace my inner legend.

Today I choose to show up. To push myself to do the impossible. To make a difference. And to leave the world a better and more fulfilling place. I’m living my legend Scott, all thanks to you.

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